Thank you for your patience

I recently made the decision to migrate from Blogger to WordPress after five years with Blogger. I had a good experience with Blogger overall, but these days I’ve had a difficult time finding time to blog on my PC, and I needed a better mobile platform (with two little kids, I find that if I can’t do it on my iPad, it won’t get done!).

All in all, it was actually a fairly smooth transition, thanks to my husband, who understands these things a lot better than I do! I still have some work to do (I would like to change the blog header, for example), but at least all the posts and comments are here. Unfortunately, I think email subscriptions might have been lost in the move, so if you get a chance, please re-subscribe.

Over the next few days, I will be tinkering a bit with the menu and the sidebar, so thank you for your continued patience!

 

Call for Submissions: May Issue of the Art History Carnival

The May edition of the Art History Carnival  will be posted on Friday, May 4, 2012. You can submit articles for inclusion in the carnival until 48 hours before the issue is “released” (Wednesday, May 2, 2012).

What kind of blog articles will be included?
Posts covering all periods and art mediums are welcome, as are posts discussing art criticism, architecture, design, theory and aesthetics. All submissions will be carefully reviewed, so please, no spam.

What is a Blog Carnival?
According to Wikipedia, a blog carnival is “a type of blog event…similar to a magazine, in that it is dedicated to a particular topic, and is published on a regular schedule, often weekly or monthly. Each edition of a blog carnival is in the form of a blog article that contains permalinks links to other blog articles on the particular topic.”

Blog Carnivals are a great way to help your blog reach a new audience and to make new friends in the blogosphere!

Who can submit?
Anyone, as long as you have a blog! And If you don’t blog, you can submit one of your friend’s articles (except they better be good–I’ll be reading them!).

Can I host a carnival?
Absolutely! Please let me know if you’d be interested in hosting the next issue of the carnival.

How to submit articles
You have two options:

1. Use the submission form provided by Blog Carnival (this is easiest!).
2. Send me an email. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are nominating for inclusion in the carnival, along with the name of the blog. Please put “Art History Carnival” in the title of your email to help me recognize it in my inbox!

One final thing to keep in mind:
To keep things current, posts should have been written after the date of the last Carnival. If a post is six months old, I won’t be able to include it in the Carnival, no matter how fabulous it might be.

Thank you again for your participation, and please share the news with other bloggers!

The Art History Carnival Returns in February

The Art History Carnival will be returning to The Earthly Paradise on a regular basis starting in February! The February edition of the Art History Carnival  will be posted on Wednesday, February 1, 2012. You can submit articles for inclusion in the carnival until 48 hours before the issue comes out (Monday, January 30, 2012).

What kind of blog articles will be included?
Posts covering all periods and art mediums are welcome, as are posts discussing art criticism, architecture, design, theory and aesthetics. All submissions will be carefully reviewed, so please, no spam.

What is a Blog Carnival?
According to Wikipedia, a blog carnival is “a type of blog event…similar to a magazine, in that it is dedicated to a particular topic, and is published on a regular schedule, often weekly or monthly. Each edition of a blog carnival is in the form of a blog article that contains permalinks links to other blog articles on the particular topic.”

Blog Carnivals are a great way to help your blog reach a new audience and to make new friends in the blogosphere!

Who can submit?
Anyone, as long as you have a blog! And If you don’t blog, you can submit one of your friend’s articles (except they better be good–I’ll be reading them!).

Can I host a carnival?
Absolutely! Please let me know if you’d be interested in hosting the next issue of the carnival.

How to submit articles
You have two options:

1. Use the submission form provided by Blog Carnival (this is easiest!).
2. Send me an email. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are nominating for inclusion in the carnival, along with the name of the blog. Please put “Art History Carnival” in the title of your email to help me recognize it in my inbox!

One final thing to keep in mind:
To keep things current, posts should have been written after the date of the last Carnival. If a post is six months old, I won’t be able to include it in the Carnival, no matter how fabulous it might be.

Thank you again for your participation, and please share the news with other bloggers!

Botticelli and the Medici

I’ve been keeping busy over the last couple of days with Niall Ferguson’s entertaining history of finance, The Ascent of Money. I’ve been meaning to read it for some time, and I’ve finally gotten around to it! (It’s been easier to make time for reading, now that the World Cup is drawing to a close). Anyway, I’m having a grand old time – finance has always been one of my favourite subjects. And when art and finance intersect, all the better!

The first chapter of Ferguson’s book is largely devoted to the financial machinations of the Medici. The Italian Renaissance was a time when art blossomed, thanks in a large part to the generous funding of wealthy patrons  like the Medici. The painting above, entitled “Adoration of the Magi” was commissioned by the Banker’s Guild as a tribute to the Medici family. Ferguson notes that all three of the wise men are actually modeled on members of the Medici family. Cosimo the Elder is washing the feet of baby Jesus, while Piero (center, in red) and Giovanni (white) complete the trinity. Other family members featured in the picture are Lorenzo and Giuliano. Philosopher Pico della Mirandola (who was also patronized by Lorenzo de’ Medici) is also pictured in the left foreground, wearing a dark robe and red hat. And if you ever wondered what the painter looked like, the young blond man to the far right is actually Botticelli. The painting really is a “who’s who” of the Italian Renaissance.

The Medici were certainly trumpeting their success with this painting, though I should note that Cosimo, Piero and Giovanni (the three kings in the picture), were all deceased at the time the work was produced. That did not stop Lorenzo the Magnificent from getting in on it, though. Ferguson says that Lorenzo appears in the painting in a pale blue robe, though I’ve noticed others online that seem to think he’s posing with the sword (which seems unlikely to me). I saw one posting that flags the man in black as Lorenzo, which makes the most sense to me. He’s centrally located within the painting, but not too obvious…if I was a wealthy patron, that’s where I’d put myself! Anyway, it certainly looks the most like Lorenzo…does anyone know for sure? I have been trying to find a more authoritative source, but so far, no luck.

So I’m doing a poll (unless any readers can offer a definitive ID). Where’s Lorenzo? (you can click on the picture above to take a larger look)

Here’s a head shot of Lorenzo, for comparison:

Let the debate begin!

Van Gogh on Babies

If one feels the need of something grand, something infinite, something that makes one feel aware of God, one need not go far to find it. I think that I see something deeper, more infinite, more eternal than the ocean in the expression of the eyes of a little baby when it wakes in the morning and coos or laughs because it sees the sun shining on its cradle. If there is a “ray from on high,” perhaps one can find it there. (Letter 242)

Vincent Van Gogh